Gay (man?) living at 116th& Amsterdam. My hobbies are urbanism, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, wine, running, drawing, amateur photography, architecture, and travel.

 

thisiscitylab:

Here comes Charlanta the Gargantua.

This should say “suburbanization probability,” as most of the yellow “current urban” is nothing urban in my perspective, it’s suburban puke. 

thisiscitylab:

Here comes Charlanta the Gargantua.

This should say “suburbanization probability,” as most of the yellow “current urban” is nothing urban in my perspective, it’s suburban puke. 

Jane Jacobs is the John Lennon of urbanism. She’s a superstar to urban planners, and she deserves it.

thisbigcity:

Creating walkable cities is tough when we’ve built an infrastructure that discourages walking. But it’s worth it. 

Our latest post looks at the future of the walkable neighborhood.

You must not reduce yourself to a puddle just because the person you like is afraid to swim and you are a fierce sea to them; because there will be someone who was born with love of the waves within their blood, and they will look at you with fear and respect.

T.B. LaBerge // Things I’m Still Learning at 25 (via tblaberge)

Today we often forget that prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life. We built networks of roadways and freeways like nothing any society had ever seen before. We tore down entire neighborhoods to accommodate these roads as well as the parking lots and garages required by the cars that would travel these roads; at the same time, we ripped out the tracks for streetcars and trains.

On religion in general

dearcoquette:

We know your view of the Abrahamic faiths, but I’m curious to know if it extends to the other religions of the world, such as religious Buddhism, Hinduism, Bahá’í, persisting indigenous faiths, the various branches of modern paganism, etc.?


I’m opposed to any organized belief system with…

You look around and there is an oil spill just about everyday, but we can’t put up a wind turbine because it might kill a bird or it might be ugly.

Robert Kulick, president of CRESIT Energy, on the challenges of creating a wind power revolution in Detroit.  (via thisbigcity)